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10 tips to stay warm when its freezing outside.

With the weather forecast predicting snow up and down the country again today, We know how important it is to stay warm. traditional-corner-fireplace-keeps-the-interior-warm-and-toasty-fresh
Here are our top tips for staying warm when it is freezing outside.

Layer your clothing
A tee shirt (or thermal shirt) a shirt over it, a sweater and another then a coat, hat, mittens, warm socks and boots. If you are too warm remove a layer. You will look fat, just get over it. Try getting some hand warmers, There’s nothing worse than hands and feet that are just too cold. Stick these in your pockets or under your feet to keep warmer.

Close off rooms
In the UK many homes have central heating, however why waste money heating spaces that you aren’t using. Rooms that have no water pipes or stored liquids, and aren’t where you are spending all of your time don’t need the heat. Close doors and hang a blanket over doors. Small areas are best for staying warm in. This also helps conserve your fuel for keeping you warm longer.
Use Ceiling Fans
Heat rises so place a fan near ceilings in occupied rooms to move heat from ceiling’s back into living areas. If you have a ceiling fan, you have 2 options for movement. Make sure your fan is adjusted to move air down for winter.

Stop Drafts
Air seeps in through cracks and windows. Even if your house is well insulated, in extreme weather, use the extra insulating effect of blankets over doors and windows to help. Do not let those covers touch the glass because they can freeze to the surface and form dead air spaces
Using blankets or towels on door bases can stop drafts from entering in your living area.

Good ventilation is a must
Remember when using your wood stove to make sure you are using adequate ventilation. If your stove is over 5kW make sure your vent is open and allowing free air into the space.

Keep pipes clear
Keep the water flowing and pipes free, if they freeze, do not try to thaw them with a hair dryer If your pipes do freeze and burst, make sure to turn off your water supply.
Think small
If you lose power, are out of fuel to heat, have nothing left to burn, are snowed in and isolated, think very small. Put up a tent inside, or build a fort in your living room or other room that is most interior without pipes or cold floors. Pack yourselves in because more bodies create more heat. Use all of your blankets and sleeping bags to keep warm.

Stay Hydrated
Drink lots of liquids as hypothermia sets in fast when you are not hydrated. Warm teas can help you feel warmer and keep you hydrated at the same time.

Cracking a door at night
In houses with central heating can help the flow of heat between rooms so that you get good coverage, when closing off rooms cracking the door at night will allow the heat to flow from room to room and keep that room warmer. This, of course, is good when your single heat source isn’t in that room.

Top off your Anti-freeze
Make sure to top off your anti-freeze in your cars. Otherwise, your radiator will freeze, it will crack, and you won’t have a working car. And while this won’t keep you warm inside your house, it can be problematic.

Think positively
The human mind is your worst enemy, and there is truth in the words scared silly…take an attitude of positive thought and you will be amazed at what you can do.

Our large range of woodburning stoves would make an impressive addition to any room this winter. Check out our gallery for an update of our installations and see what our teams have been doing.

Until Next time.

Keep warm in style.

Published: 31st Jan '19
Author: Nicola Williams

Our supply, survey and installation service covers the following areas: Bournemouth, Christchurch, Dorchester, Poole, Romsey, Salisbury, Southampton, Wimborne and Winchester and other areas in Dorset in Hampshire. Site surveys outside a 30 mile radius of Wimborne will incure a charge a £25 which is deductable should you accept our quotation. We are also pleased to invite enquiries from further afield.